Using fluorescent colored tape as his medium, Aakash Nihalani creates impermanent and playful art around the streets of New York City. Most of his work consists of isometric rectangles and squares, placing them in the middle of the day, in plain view. His nonchalance is due to the ease with which his pieces can be removed. Sometimes they get taken down immediately, sometimes he is allowed to take a picture first. His designs can be as simple as a single rectangle and other times they are great networks of interworking patterns. Nihalani  is known to work with already existing city structures, signs, or even other people’s street art, including Banksy’s “Flower Thrower,” adding neon colors to the original black and white stencil image.

He enjoys using “the city as a raw material,” he says, offering people a chance to step into a “different New York than they are used to seeing.” On park benches, sidewalks, doorways, and subway platforms, Nihalani utilizes public space to incorporate color and create impromptu pieces of urban art. He also has pieces in Vienna, LA, Missouri, and India. Most recently, Facebook commissioned Nihalani to create a tape art installation in their New York office. See more of his other forms of art on his website and blog.


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Using fluorescent colored tape as his medium, Aakash Nihalani creates impermanent and playful art around the streets of New York City. Most of his work consists of isometric rectangles and squares, placing them in the middle of the day, in plain view. His nonchalance is due to the ease with which his pieces can be removed. Sometimes they get taken down immediately, sometimes he is allowed to take a picture first. His designs can be as simple as a single rectangle and other times they are great networks of interworking patterns. Nihalani  is known to work with already existing city structures, signs, or even other people’s street art, including Banksy’s “Flower Thrower,” adding neon colors to the original black and white stencil image.

He enjoys using “the city as a raw material,” he says, offering people a chance to step into a “different New York than they are used to seeing.” On park benches, sidewalks, doorways, and subway platforms, Nihalani utilizes public space to incorporate color and create impromptu pieces of urban art. He also has pieces in Vienna, LA, Missouri, and India. Most recently, Facebook commissioned Nihalani to create a tape art installation in their New York office. See more of his other forms of art on his website and blog.